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Exhibition: September 11

September 11
September 11, 2011–January 9, 2012

MoMA PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue
Long Island City, NY 11101

http://www.momaps1.org

Since that fall morning in 2001, “September 11” has come to connote a broad swath of feelings and subjects that range from the personal to the national; it has been used to justify political, security, and military decisions the world over, while continuing to weigh upon the landscape of New York and its inhabitants, particularly those directly affected by the attacks. Witnessed by an estimated two billion people, the attacks on the World Trade Center were among the most pictured disasters in history, yet they remain, a decade later, underrepresented in cultural discourse—particularly within the realm of contemporary art.

Responding to these conditions, MoMA PS1 Curator Peter Eleey brings together more than 70 works by 41 artists—many made prior to 9/11—to explore the attacks’ enduring and far-reaching resonance. Eschewing images of the event itself, as well as art made directly in response, the exhibition provides a subjective framework within which to reflect upon the attacks in New York and their aftermath, exploring the ways that they have altered how we see and experience the world in their wake. September 11 opens on the tenth anniversary of the attacks and occupies the entire second floor of the museum, with additional works located elsewhere in the building and in the surrounding neighborhood, including one of Thomas Hirschhorn’s street altars from the late 1990s, which will be installed for the first month of the exhibition on a street corner near MoMA PS1.

Artists in the Exhibition
Diane Arbus, Siah Armajani, Fiona Banner, Luis Camnitzer, Janet Cardiff, John Chamberlain, Sarah Charlesworth, Christo, Jem Cohen, Bruce Conner, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Shannon Ebner, William Eggleston, Harun Farocki, Lara Favaretto, Jane Freilicher, Maureen Gallace, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jens Haaning, Susan Hiller, Roger Hiorns, Thomas Hirschhorn, Alex Katz, Ellsworth Kelly, Barbara Kruger, Mark Lombardi, Mary Lucier, Gordon Matta-Clark, Harold Mendez, Mike Nelson, Cady Noland, Roman Ondák, Yoko Ono and John Lennon, John Pilson, Willem de Rooij, George Segal, Rosemarie Trockel, James Turrell, Stephen Vitiello, and John Williams.

Catalog
September 11 is accompanied by a fully illustrated 248-page catalog designed by Kloepfer-Ramsey and published by MoMA PS1. In addition to Peter Eleey’s curatorial essay, it includes new contributions by Robert Hullot-Kentor and Alexander Dumbadze, as well as texts by Alexander Kluge, W.J.T. Mitchell, and Retort. Distributed by D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers, Inc., available online and at the ARTBOOK shop at MoMA PS1, +1 (718) 433-1088. ISBN 978-0-9841776-3-9.

Exhibition Support
The exhibition is made possible by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation, the Teiger Foundation, and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Generous support is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.

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Art: Untitled New York

Sydney Hart
NY, USA / Canada
“Untitled New York”, 2009

“Untitled New York” (work in progress) is an ongoing series of photographs exploring the urban fabric of NYC and how its citizens relate to it, from the time I moved to the city in February 2009 to the present. I was interested in documenting the ruptures in an otherwise hyper-efficient network of grids and lines of mass transit; the organic interventions that anonymously comment on the status of these systems, with hints (that may fall on deaf municipal ears) as to how they should be improved. Having moved here in the midst of the economic crisis, I projected the state of the infrastructure as contingent on the self-made financial crisis of Wall st, on the expenses and budgeting of this financial hub now hit at its centre. The disruptions in the urban fabric (caused directly or indirectly by human intervention) were interesting to me as comments on the urban infrastructure’s use, from the people who use it, through indifference, neglect, transgression or facetiousness. In Bushwick, fire hydrants (in parts of Brooklyn called “johnny pumps”) were breached open, flooding the vicinity and making an island of a nearby Mercedes. In the same area, parked cars were used to block off traffic on Sundays, leaving locals the luxury of hanging a huge volley-ball net across two trees, with speaker piles in the middle of the street providing the soundtrack. Do these instances reflect a lapse in municipal amenities? Are the inhabitants of Bushwick merely filling in the gaps of the government’s neglect? Or are they -like the inconspicuous interventions into the grid of the subway with overtly domestic and personal items- necessarily personal and anonymous acts of generosity?”

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