Exhibition: The End of Money

Witte de With
Center for Contemporary Art
Witte de Withstraat 50
3012 BR Rotterdam
The Netherlands
http://www.wdw.nl

Witte de With is pleased to present two events in May: The opening of the group exhibition The End of Money and the first two lectures in the series To Tell The Truth.

THE END OF MONEY
Group exhibition
22 May–7 August 2011

Opening
Saturday 21 May 2011 (6 to 9 pm)
Performance by Goldin+Senneby at 7 pm

Film Screening
Sunday 26 June 2011 (12 to 6 pm)

The End of Money is a group exhibition about time and value. Bringing together works by a host of international artists, this exhibition reflects upon the fears, hopes, and expectations associated with the end of money and its ominous consequence: the dissolution of an absolute standard of value.

What limits does the economy impose on our collective imagination, and how is the collective imagination responsible for the current economy? The End of Money focuses on the multiple relationships that could and those that should exist between culture and economy. Informing this curatorial project is the utopian notion that, in a world without money—a world where money has been factored out of the collective memory, other suppressed forms of value may emerge, leading to another social bond and a different relationship to time.

The works included in The End of Money range from reflections on the arbitrary ways in which value is ascribed to things to explorations of the absolute loss of representative value. Some of the featured works highlight time, which is a persistent corollary of money in our efficiency-obsessed culture.

Artists
Alexander Apostol; Pierre Bismuth; Peter Fischli & David Weiss; Zachary Formwalt; Goldin+Senneby; Hadley+Maxwell; Toril Johannessen; Vishal Jugdeo; Agnieszka Kurant; Matts Leiderstam; Maha Maamoun; Christodoulos Panayiotou; Lili Reynaud-Dewar; Tomas Saraceno; Tonel; Vangelis Vlahos; and Lawrence Weiner.

Curated by
Juan A. Gaitán; assisted by Amira Gad.

Publication
To accompany the exhibition, a digital publication will be made available for free download via http://www.wdw.nl in July 2011 and will feature texts by: Dessislava Dimova, Donatien Grau, Dieter Roelstraete, and Carolina Sanin.

Tours
• Every Wednesday and Sunday, 3 pm: tours for individuals in English or Dutch. Free excluding exhibition entry price. No reservation necessary.
• Tours are available for groups of 10 to 15 people. reservations@wdw.nl

Education
Witte de With Education offers ‘art confrontations,’ interactive tours for schools and universities. reservations@wdw.nl

Supported by
OCA, Pro Helvetia: Swiss Arts Council, Cypriot Ministry of Education & Culture. With thanks to the Fonds BKVB.

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Project: Time/Bank

Time/Bank at Portikus
7 May–26 June 2011

Opening:
6 May 2011, 8 pm

Press preview:
6 May 2011, 11 am

Portikus
Alte Brücke 2 / Maininsel
60594 Frankfurt am Main
http://www.portikus.de
e-flux.com/timebank

On May 6, 2011, Portikus will become a bank. Initiated by artists Julieta Aranda and Anton Vidokle in 2009, Time/Bank is a platform that enables people to trade goods and services without using money. With a growing pool of more than a thousand participants around the world, Time/Bank allows groups and individuals to collectively exchange their time and skills through the use of credits earned through the bank, as an intermediary and guarantor. Time/Bank aims to create an immaterial currency and a parallel micro-economy for the cultural community, one that will create a sense of worth for many of the exchanges that already take place within the art field.

At Portikus, the Time/Bank will be comprised of four main components: an exhibition of artist-designed prototypes for a time-based currency; a currency mint that will print and circulate four hundred Hour Notes—one for each hour of the exhibition; an archive of notgeld notes—the legendary German alternative currency popular during the hyperinflation of the 1920s; a branch of Time/Store offering a range of commodities, groceries, and articles of daily use, as well as a selection of artist’s editions and books produced by Portikus.

Time/Bank at Portikus will host a series of public seminars and talks by the theorist and activist Franco Berardi (Bifo); Paul Glover, founder of Ithaca Hours local currency system; anthropologist Elizabeth Povinelli, professor at Columbia University; and artists Raqs Media Collective.

The Frankfurt branch of Time/Bank will include a network of local art institutions and organizations, such as the MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt and the Jewish Museum, amongst others, where the currency of the Time/Bank—Hour Notes, designed by the American artist Lawrence Weiner—can be used for admission, and to make purchases in cafeterias and books stores.

In conjunction with the exhibition, Portikus will publish a book dealing with qualities of time, gift economies, alternative currencies, and other related topics. The book will include commissioned essays and illustrations, as well as contributions by members of Time/Bank.

TIme/Bank Frankfurt Lecture:

Franco Berardi (Bifo)
Tuesday, 10. May 2011, 19:00, Portikus

The main cultural transformation of modern capitalism has been the creation of refrains of temporal perception that pervade and discipline society: the refrain of factory work, the refrain of the salary, the refrain of production line. The digital transition has brought along with it new refrains: electronic fragmentation, information overload, acceleration of the semiotic exchange. Fractalization of time, competition. The essential feature of refrain is the rhythm. Rhythm is the relation of a subjective flow of signs (musical, poetic, gestual signs) with the environment: cosmic environment, earthly environment, social environment. Rhythm is singular and collective. It is singularizing the sound of the world in a special modeling of the environmental sound. But it is able to trigger a process of agglutination, of sensitive and sensible communality. Sometime people start to sing the same song, and to dance the same dance. It can be dangerous, and on this kind of homogeneous subjectivation is based fascism, and modern totalitarianism in general. But it can happen in ironic and nomadic ways. People start to create a new song, and they do it together. That’s a movement.

Franco Berardi, aka “Bifo,” founder of the famous “Radio Alice” in Bologna and an important figure of the Italian Autonomia Movement, is a writer, media theorist, and media activist. He currently teaches Social History of the Media at the Accademia di Brera, Milan.

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Article: Fillip 13: Intangible Economies

Fillip 13

Subscribe online at:
fillip.ca/subscriptions

Fillip 13 introduces Intangible Economies, a new, ongoing series broadening the notion of economy beyond its financial dimensions. The series focuses on the multifarious forms of exchange fuelled by affect and desire, speculatively investigating the fundamental role these affective transactions play in modes of representation and, accordingly, in cultural production.

This issue includes series texts by Candice Hopkins, Jan Verwoert, and series editor Antonia Hirsch. Forthcoming installments will include contributions by Hadley+Maxwell, Olaf Nicolai, and Monika Szewczyk, among others.

Also in Fillip 13:

Carson Chan: Measures of an Exhibition
Anthony Downey: Camps (or the Precarious Logic of Late Modernity)

Lisa Marshall: An Evidence Horizon

Haema Sivanesan: Producing Images in Times of War
Ryan Trecartin in conversation with Kristina Lee Podesva
Claire Tancons and Jesse McKee: On Carnival and Contractual Curating

The issue also features a record of The AAAARG Library, a site-specific installation commissioned for Fillip 13 and the 2010 NY Art Book Fair. The Library, produced by artist Sean Dockray and curated by Jeff Khonsary, will be presented again this summer as part of Night Market, a Red76 project for the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in North Adams, MA.

Fillip
305 Cambie Street
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2N4
604.781.4417
http://www.fillip.ca

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Images: Signs of Crisis – Madrid 2010

Photos from Madrid during our participation at the European Congress of Aesthetics: ‘Societies in Crisis’ Nov 2010.

Their profits, our crisis. Another world is possible.

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Film: “Free Fall” by Hito Steyerl

Hito Steyerl
4 November – 19 December 2010

Chisenhale Gallery
64 Chisenhale Road
London E3 5QZ
+44 (0) 20 8981 4518
mail@chisenhale.org.uk
http://www.chisenhale.org.uk

Chisenhale Gallery presents Hito Steyerl’s first major solo exhibition in London. In Free Fall (2010), a new film co-commissioned by Chisenhale Gallery, Picture This, Bristol and Collective, Edinburgh, incorporates a series of works—After the Crash, Before the Crash and Crash—which employs the setting and characters of an aeroplane junkyard in the Californian desert to tell the story of the current economic climate.

The space of the junkyard allows various ‘crash’ narratives to unfold, with the stories of actual crashes and the remnants and afterlife of these machines becoming metaphors for economic decline. This is an investigation of planes as they are parked during the economic downturn, stored and recycled, revealing unexpected connections between economy, violence and spectacle, finding perfect example in the form of the Boeing 4X-JYI, an aircraft first acquired by film director Howard Hughes for TWA, which was subsequently flown by the Israeli Airforce before finding its way to the Californian desert to be blown up for the Hollywood blockbuster Speed. Through intertwined narratives of people, planes and places Steyerl reveals cycles of capitalism incorporating and adapting to the changing status of the commodity, but also points at a horizon beyond this endless repetition.

A prolific writer, filmmaker, theorist and teacher, Steyerl’s research and interests cover topics as diverse as cultural globalisation, feminism, culture, migration and racism. Her films are a montage of politics and pop, Hollywood and independent film, interviews and voice-over commentaries, which present provocative filmic analyses of the present.

Hito Steyerl (b. 1966) is based in Berlin. Recent solo exhibitions include Picture This, Bristol; Collective, Edinburgh; Henie Onstad Centre, Høvikodden; Villa Stuck, Munich; Collective, Edinburgh (all 2010); Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (2009); and Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2008). Group exhibitions include Taipei Biennial; 1st Ural Biennial; Gwangju Biennial; ‘Antiphotojournalism’, La Virreina, Barcelona; ‘Horizons’, BAK, Utrecht (all 2010); ‘Dispersion’, ICA, London; U-Turn Kvadriennale for Samtidskunst, Copenhagen (both 2008); ‘documenta 12’, Kassel (2007) and ‘Manifesta 5’, San Sebastian (2004).

TALKS & EVENTS
Wednesday 17 November, 7pm Mark Fisher, author of Capitalist Realism (2009, Zero Books) and lecturer at Goldsmiths and University of East London, presents a talk in which he asks the question: ‘Can anything genuinely new emerge in a political landscape that is clogged with ideological junk?’

Saturday 27 November, 2pm A panel discussion focusing on the notion of the ‘biography of the object’ with Hito Steyerl, Peter Osborne, Professor of Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, and Eyal Weizman, Director of Centre for Research Architecture, Goldsmiths, University of London, and chaired by Melissa Gronlund, Managing Editor, Afterall.

Thursday 2 December, 7pm Screening of Hito Steyerl’s November (2004) and On Three Posters. Reflections on a video-performance (2004) by Rabih Mroué.

The exhibition is supported by IFA, Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen and Creative Scotland.

Chisenhale Exhibitions Partner 2010: Outset Contemporary Art Fund

Chisenhale Gallery is funded by Arts Council England and is a registered charity no. 1026175

For more information please contact mail@chisenhale.org.uk or +44 20 8981 4518

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Article: The Crunch and the Crisis: the unravelling of lifestyle capitalism?

Rising East, UEL journal
Vol 1, Series 1, No 1 April 8th 2009
Gavin Poynter

Introduction

In 2008, the ‘credit crunch’ progressed from financial crisis to global economic recession, its impact spreading from the US housing market to western financial markets and, by the end of the year, to most nations and sectors of the international economy. Its origins in the highly technical character of the ‘toxic’ products spawned in the financial world of intermediation and risk management have informed a hesitant and, in turn, managerial analysis of causality. This hesitancy was reflected in the statements expressed by politicians and business leaders throughout much of 2008 as they oscillated between inaction and reaction and expressed fears, in turn, about the crisis realising uncontrollable inflationary or deflationary trends.
For much of 2008, American and British politicians and business leaders were anxious to downplay the problems created by the credit crisis until the financial world reached the brink of collapse. The UK government, spent much of the year in denial about the weakness of the British economy – it was sound in its essentials, blaming US and wider international developments for the position the UK economy is in 1; while the US government dithered over a bailout plan which was initially designed to buy up all the worthless, toxic assets of the finance sector but eventually took the form of buying shares in US banks.
The combination of denial, hesitancy and indecision that has characterised responses to the current economic crisis has its origins in the political and business world’s interpretation of the recent performance of the western, mainly Anglo-American, model of capitalism. Those who have sought to manage it have created a rhetoric laced with words such as stability, expansion, and globalisation when, in reality, the leading Western nation, the USA, and its satellite, the UK, have sought to manage economies whose productive dynamism has disappeared and who rely increasingly upon servicing the productive activities that take place elsewhere in the world. A thin veil of respectability has been lent to this perception by the theorisation of knowledge as the intangible, magical ingredient of a new type of Western economy that lives by its wits rather than by what it makes 2.
The hollow character of these ideas and policies is now perhaps exposed, creating an opportunity for a more considered and reflective view of what is really happening in the West and the wider world. This essay discusses the causes of the current economic crisis and examines the social conditions of its emergence, as well as exploring the limitations of the actions currently being taken to tackle it; the limits, in other words, of what some commentators refer to as a Keynesian programme of state intervention 3.

http://www.uel.ac.uk/risingeast/essays/2009-04-01.htm

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Event: Seminar Series on Debt, Pain, Work

Centre for Cultural Studies Research
University of East London

The Politics of Debt
13 October 2010
14:00 to 17:00
The first of our series of seminars examining the meaning of Debt, Pain and Work in the era of austerity and coalition politics…

The Politics of Debt: Concepts and experiences of debt have become central to the management of contemporary capitalism, to understandings of its consequences and to social experience at every scale. National debt, personal debt, ecological debt are key issues for understanding contemporary culture and politics. But what exactly is debt? Can we manage without it? Are current levels of personal, national, corporate and ecological debt sustainable; and what are the origins of this most fundamental concept?

speakers:

Aditya Chakrabortty, The Guardian, New Political Economy Network

Joe Cox, Campaigns Organiser at Compass, organiser of the Compass campaign against legal loan sharking

Massimo De Angelis, UEL, author of The Beginning of History: Value Struggles and Global Capital, Keynesianism, Social Conflict and Political Economy.

David Graeber, Goldsmiths College, author of Possibilities: Essays on Hierarchy, Rebellion and Desire and Direct Action: an Ethnography, currently working on a history of debt.

Room EB.G.16 (Ground Floor, East Building, Docklands Campus – East Building is to the left on entering the main square from Cyprus station)

All welcome, no need to book in advance
Further info contact Jeremy Gilbert: j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk

New Seminar Series: Debt, Pain, Work
13 October 2010
14:00
Focusing on the themes of debt, pain, and work, the coalition government has attempted to build a new common sense around the need for deep public sector spending cuts, the curtailment of strategic health authority and local governmental influence in the provision of health and education, and the sweeping shift from public sector to private sector delivery. This academic year the Centre for Cultural Studies Research at UEL is holding three linked seminars on the themes of Debt (13 October), Pain (December 1) and Work (date to be confirmed) in order to interrogate the substance of the government’s strategy. Each event will be held at UEL’s Docklands Campus in East London, and will feature speakers from a range of activist, journalistic and research backgrounds.

http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/

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