Category Archives: Art

Film: Popular Unrest by Melanie Gilligan

Popular Unrest, is a multi-episode drama set in a future much like the present. Here, however, all exchange transactions and social interactions are overseen by a system called ‘the Spirit’. A rash of unexplained killings have broken out across the globe. They often take place in public but witnesses never see an assailant. Just as mysteriously, groups of unrelated people are suddenly coming together everywhere, amassing new members rapidly. Unaccountably, they feel a deep and persistent sense of connection to one another.

The film explores a world in which the self is reduced to physical biology, directly subject to the needs of capital. Hotels offer bed-warming servants with every room, people are fined for not preventing foreseeable illness, weight watching foods eat the digester from the inside and the unemployed repay their debt to society in physical energy. If on the one hand this suggests the complete domination of life by exchange value do the groupings offer a way out?

Shot in London with a cast of twelve main actors, the film’s form is partly inspired by David Cronenberg’s ‘body horror’ and American television dramas CSI, Dexter and Bones, where reality is perceived through a pornographic forensics of empirical and visceral phenomena. As with Gilligan’s recent video works, the film’s episodic structure takes its cue from television and the medium’s ability to dispense its storyline in stages.

Melanie Gilligan was born in Toronto in 1979. She currently lives in London and New York and works in a variety of media including video, performance, text, installation and music. Gilligan completed a BA (Hons) Fine Art at Central Saint Martins in 2002 and was a Fellow with the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Programme in 2004-5. Recent exhibitions include: Transmission Gallery Glasgow (2008) as part of the Glasgow International Festival and Franco Soffiantino Gallery, Turin (2009). In 2008 Gilligan released Crisis in the Credit System, a four-part fictional mini drama about the recent financial crisis, made specifically for internet viewing and distribution, commissioned and produced by Artangel Interaction. She has recently completed a single screen film Self-capital (2009), commissioned by the Institute of Contemporary Arts London as part of the group exhibition ‘Talk Show’. In October 2009 Gilligan was the recipient of a Paul Hamlyn Award for Artists.

http://www.popularunrest.org/

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Art: Following the Crisis

FOLLOWING THE CRISIS – INSTRUCTION FOR A DÉRIVE
As part of the exhibition Too Big To Fail / Too Small to Succeed, currently in the court yard at SPACE, we invite you on a Dérive through the financial centre of London.

The Dérive is a psychogeographical self-experiment with the aim of re-appropriating an urban environment through personal wanderings.

Please send an rsvp email to connect@bitnik.org for further instructions.

Too Big To Fail / Too Small to Succeed is kindly supported by SPACE and The Swiss Cultural Fund in Britain.

SPACE: 30 Sept 2010

http://space.modernactivity.co.uk/whats-on/events/following-the-crisis-instruction-for-a-d-rive

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Publication: Art Asia Pacific issue 65

ArtAsiaPacific
Issue 65
Sept/Oct 2009

http://www.aapmag.com

The depressed global economy has raised the stakes for government leaders around the world as frustrated citizens cry out for political and social reform. Waves of civil unrest in Asia have dominated the international media in recent months. In mid-June, massive protests in Iran followed the announcement of questionable results for the presidential election. Meanwhile, in western China, simmering tensions between Muslim Uighurs and Han Chinese erupted into bloody riots, resulting in some 200 dead, more than 1,000 injured and many more arrested.

ArtAsiaPacific’s September/October issue focuses on artists whose work engages with politically charged themes and seeks out alternative resolutions to the world’s most deeply entrenched problems.

The horrifying specter of nuclear war remains a sensitive topic in Japan. Features editor Ashley Rawlings examines how the irreverent Japanese collective ChimPom broke one of the country’s touchiest taboos after skywriting the word PIKA (meaning “flash” and an overt reference to the atomic bomb) in white smoke over Hiroshima. Rawlings analyzes why the city’s residents found the group’s action unacceptable, yet were able to embrace other interpretations of the 1945 explosions by artists such as Cai Guo-Qiang.

Turning to Taiwan, AAP’s desk editor in Taipei David Frazier looks at the sexually charged paintings and digital prints of Wu Tien-chang while reflecting on the island’s transition from four decades of martial law to democracy in 1987. Curator and scholar Britta Erickson explores the diverse work of Yang Jiechang, revealing how the artist regularly encounters social and political antagonism when he exhibits, not only in his home country of China but also in France and Poland. From the Middle East, AA contributor and Almanac co-editor Marisa Mazria-Katz considers the ruminative work of Yael Bartana, an Israeli artist who critiques Zionist propaganda in videos that touch on Israeli national identity. Looking north to Lebanon, managing editor HG Masters traces recent developments in the work of conceptualist Walid Raad who, after retiring his project the Atlas Group on the history of the Lebanese Civil War (1975–90), has turned his attention to the development of art and culture in the Middle East, including the massive museum construction projects in Abu Dhabi.

In Profiles, AAP meets instrumental figures in China, Iran and Australia. Vicki and Kent Logan, owners of the largest private collection contemporary Chinese art in the United States, talk about their fascination with Cynical Realism, and how the 1990s movement broadened their understanding of social change in China. AAP’s West Asia desk editor Sara Raza talks to artist, curator, collector and gallerist Fereydoun Ave about developments in the Iranian art scene following the 1979 Islamic Revolution, and his recent mixed-media collages portraying heroic figures from Persian medieval poetry. Michael Young sits down with John Kaldor, Australia’s leading contemporary arts patron, who has commissioned major public artworks in Sydney by Christo, Gregor Schneider and others over the last 40 years.

In Projects, NaoKo TakaHashi, a Japanese performance artist who has worked in Jerusalem, tells AAP about how she transformed her experience as an immigrant in London into performances and installations that record social interactions with unwitting participants. For Where I Work, AAP visited Naiza Khan in her Karachi studio, filled with the artist’s haunting abstractions of the female body and her more recent work about urban decay. Reflecting on the history of the Subcontinent, senior editor Don J. Cohn reviews three recent books on India’s passage to artistic and cultural modernity. In My Eight, artist and biting social critic Ai Weiwei lists his favorite governments, and as a reminder that democracies are not immune to the erosion of civil liberties, independent curator Hyunjin Kim discusses the South Korean government’s regulation of free speech and deep budgetary cuts to the country’s arts infrastructure.

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Art: Untitled New York

Sydney Hart
NY, USA / Canada
“Untitled New York”, 2009

“Untitled New York” (work in progress) is an ongoing series of photographs exploring the urban fabric of NYC and how its citizens relate to it, from the time I moved to the city in February 2009 to the present. I was interested in documenting the ruptures in an otherwise hyper-efficient network of grids and lines of mass transit; the organic interventions that anonymously comment on the status of these systems, with hints (that may fall on deaf municipal ears) as to how they should be improved. Having moved here in the midst of the economic crisis, I projected the state of the infrastructure as contingent on the self-made financial crisis of Wall st, on the expenses and budgeting of this financial hub now hit at its centre. The disruptions in the urban fabric (caused directly or indirectly by human intervention) were interesting to me as comments on the urban infrastructure’s use, from the people who use it, through indifference, neglect, transgression or facetiousness. In Bushwick, fire hydrants (in parts of Brooklyn called “johnny pumps”) were breached open, flooding the vicinity and making an island of a nearby Mercedes. In the same area, parked cars were used to block off traffic on Sundays, leaving locals the luxury of hanging a huge volley-ball net across two trees, with speaker piles in the middle of the street providing the soundtrack. Do these instances reflect a lapse in municipal amenities? Are the inhabitants of Bushwick merely filling in the gaps of the government’s neglect? Or are they -like the inconspicuous interventions into the grid of the subway with overtly domestic and personal items- necessarily personal and anonymous acts of generosity?”

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Art: Dance With Us

DANCE WITH US (2008)
Source : Nasdaq Yahoo

Fred Astaire danse au rythme de l’économie américaine. Fred Astaire dances to the rhythm of the American economy.

http://incident.net/works/oboro/3.html

Dance with US (2008)
Installation interactive / interactive installation
Vidéoprojecteur, écran LCD , bois, ordinateur, joggle, Director
Programmation / Software:Vadim Bernard
The scene, already employed in Possibles Bodies (2002), is connected to the American Stock Exchange in real time. Fred Astaire dances to the rhythm of the economy: the more volatile the tradings, the more fluid the movements.

Artist:
Born in Paris.
Grégory Chatonsky currently resides in Montreal and Paris.
He holds a philosophy master’s from the Sorbonne and a multimedia advanced degree from the Ecole nationale superieure des beaux-arts in Paris. He has worked on numerous solo and group projects in France, Canada, the United States, Italy, Australia, Germany, Finland and Spain. His works have been acquired by public collectors such as the Maison Europeenne de la Photographie.
In 1994, Chatonsky founded a net.art collective, incident.net, and has produced numerous works, such as the websites of the Pompidou Centre and Villa Médicis, the graphic signature for the Musée contemporain du Val-de-Marne, and interactive fiction for Arte. He has taught at the Fresnoy (national modern art studio, France) and at UQAM’s school of visual and media art.
Chatonsky’s body of work, including interactive installations, networked and urban devices, photographs and sculptures, speaks to the relationship between technologies and affectivity, flow that define our time and attempts to create new forms of fiction.

http://gregory.incident.net/

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Exhibition/Project: Open Sailing

Open Sailing
London, UK

“We are building a floating architecture that evolves like a living organism, a laboratory for techno-social experiments.

“Open_Sailing” aims to design an attractive technological lifestyle to overcome any possible natural and man-made disaster, stimulating people’s ingenuity and sense of solidarity. Be it overpopulation, global warming or energy conflicts, we are living in a time where “Apocalypse” beckons. We need to collectively invent and spread bootstrapping DIY technologies for the forthcoming challenges, not only to survive but to re-invent how we inhabit this planet.

We are trying to create a truly “Open_Architecture”. This is a drifting village of solid and comfortable shelters surrounded by flexible ocean farming units : fluid, pre-broken, reconfigurable, sustainable, pluggable, organic and instinctive. The Open_Sailing_01 is about 50 m in diameter, for 4 persons.

In the process we are developing and testing numerous novel technologies, such as “Instinctive_Architecture”, “Energy_Animal”, and “Life_Cable” within an innovative nomadic ecosystem. The “Swarm_Search_Engine” is a distributed operating system that suggests a general safest location and a form for the overall structure that constantly reconfigures itself in order to provide intelligent distribution of supplies, energy and information. Open_Sailing aims to ask questions about the way we currently inhabit our planet. Can we reach a harmonious dynamic state of interdependence with each other and the earth? Is this the next step for civilization? Will we disassociate our concept of progress with rigid infrastructure and metropolis?”

http://international-ocean-station.org

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Art: Fiona Long – Post Consumer Material Culture

After Day X

After Day X

Fiona Long, London UK

“In my imagined post apocalyptic scenario “After Day X” the resulting population will find objects from our time and wonder what to make of and from them. But what will this archaeology of the future tell us about our civilisation today?”

http://fionalongart.co.uk/archives/post-consumer-material-culture

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