Digital Archive

The End of Something is a critical archival project that brings together reflections, ideas, and experiences of the global crisis from varied perspectives and opinions. It is a project that attempts to approach an idea of a rather complex time. TEOS is a digital archive as well as physical archive (situated at Volume, in South East London) for Summer 2009. This site is serves as the Digital Archive where contents will be updated and available.

HOW TO USE: To use the site use the Search (on the right hand column) or the Categories and Tags to view materials in the archive. The archive has been organized by object (articles, links, film/video, images..) and by Subject and by Location (all countries + London). Contributions are blogged as we receive them.

Contributions for Sound of Ebb can be view here: http://theendofsomething.wordpress.com/category/sound-of-ebb/

Call for Contribution !

*** Tell a story or anecdote or take a photo about the changes you notice in everyday life and people within your social context in light of the current crisis. *** please indicate your name, geographic location and send responses to: teos.project (a) gmail.com

  • If the World came to an end how would you imagine picking up the pieces and starting over?
  • What is the best thing about having less work, less money and more time? How would you best spend your (Free) time?

We are open for contribution for:
1. Personal reflections/stories (or responses to the above questions)
2. Web links to articles/texts, documents/publications/press releases/statements for film/artworks or events/exhibitions/conferences on the global crisis

All submissions will be uploaded to online and exhibited at Volume during August 2009. The End of Something is a non-profit independent initiative.

Please email responses to: teos.project@gmail.com
Include your name, location and details/description of the submission. If you are submitting any personal creative content, please specify if you have any terms of usage or creative license you would like to apply. i.e. Creative Commons

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Article: occupy and assemble – transversal web journal

#occupy and assemble∞
transversal web journal

From the sit-ins on the Kasbah Square in Tunis to the tents on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Aviv, from the encampments on the Puerta del Sol in Madrid to Syntagma Square in Athens, from the Wisconsin Uprising to Occupy LA, from Tahrir Square in Cairo to Liberty Plaza in New York – there is an incredible movement of occupations growing in this year of 2011. Slogans like “They don’t represent us” call for a non-representationist political practice, inventive forms of assembling bring new meaning to the good old general assembly, reappropriations of space and time thwart the logic of private and public: There is a new abstract machine in the making, traversing the local practices, empowering itself with every new space that is occupied, every new assembly that finds another form of expression and sociality. This issue of transversal is a discursive component of this abstract machine emerging from the actual experiences of Occupy Wall Street, dedicated to all the precarious occupiers in the world.

http://eipcp.net/transversal/1011

Contents
Judith Butler: Bodies in Alliance and the Politics of the Street
Nicole Demby: Liberty Plaza. A “Message” Entangled with its Form
Isabell Lorey: Non-representationist, Presentist Democracy
Gerald Raunig: The Molecular Strike
Nato Thompson: The Occupation of Wall Street Across Time and Space
Dan S. Wang: From One Moment to the Next, Wisconsin to Wall Street


eipcp – european institute for progressive cultural policies
a-1060 vienna, gumpendorfer strasse 63b
a-4040 linz, harruckerstrasse 7

contact@eipcp.net

http://www.eipcp.net

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Art: The Art Scene Responds To The Troubled Economy

The Art Scene Responds To The Troubled Economy
Lauren Leibowitz September 26, 2011

Like many New Yorkers, we’ve been following reports on the Occupy Wall Street protests happening in New York City’s financial district this past week. National media has been all atwitter with reports of attacks on these peaceful protesters, who have assembled a diverse group of demonstrators to make a statement about government corruption and the privileging of big business and the wealthy 1% in American policy-making.

No one was safe from their wrath, not even the art world, which typically serves as a bastion of cultural criticism and social commentary on matters of civic discontent. In an effort to champion workers’ rights over corporate greed, protesters took aim at Sotheby’s by repeatedly interrupting an art auction at the famed art auction house last week, pledging their allegiance to Sotheby’s art handlers, who have been struggling over contract negotiations. The art auction served as a poignant reminder of the discrepancies in the distribution of wealth in the art market itself, a sort of microcosm of the larger financial issues plaguing our country.

We decided to pay homage to art’s traditional role in this conversation—as criticism, commentary and instigator—by taking a look at some of the projects that have tapped into our social zeitgeist, activating it via emotive visual experiences to address the recession, unemployment and lots of other factors contributing to this particularly charged moment of worldwide economic crisis. These responses date back to 2008, when the recession first began, and paint an interesting trajectory of how the dialogue has shifted since.

Damon Rich, “Red Lines Crisis Housing Learning Center” (2008)

Damon Rich designed an architectural model to represent home foreclosures in New York City based on a panorama of the city from the 1964 World’s Fair. “In some way, I hope my exhibitions function as strange educational playgrounds for adults,” he told the New York Times.

“Dead End Part I” from arsoni5t on Vimeo (2008)

This intriguing animated graphic novel, though in German, contains many themes pertinent to the American economic climate. The Dead End series takes place during the financial crisis of 2008, and depicts an armed zombie uprising. The stark black and white imagery evokes the cold hard attitude we feel toward the machine.

Pathways To Housing staged this video installation last spring, developed in partnership with the creative agency Sarkissian Mason. The organization drew the attention of passersby to the plight of the city’s many homeless, a group whose interests are ignored all too often. A video projection of a slumbering, shivering man encouraged pedestrians to send a text message to the charity, which would, in effect, help the ghostly figure to find shelter.

“We Like America and America Likes Us” from Bruce High Quality Foundation on Vimeo (2010)

Anonymous artist collective The Bruce High Quality Foundation made this video as part of the 2010 Whitney Biennial about our complex relationship with our country. The video was projected onto the windshield of an ambulance/hearse in the exhibition, with montages from American cultural touchstones set to a narration from a disembodied voice that critiques the conflicts of our shared experiences. “We wish we could have fallen in love with America… but it never made sense.”

SPENT, (2011)

Playspent.org, an interactive site, comes from McKinney and Urban Ministries of Durham, and sets out to prove that poverty is no game. SPENT is a simulation of the choices a low-income single parent must make to survive, putting the player in the tough position of choosing between essentials like auto payments or a child’s field trip funding. You might make it through the simulated month—but you might not be happy with the results.

ATM or this is [not] new york, Sponsored By Nobody (ongoing)

ATM or this is [not] new york is an NYC-based performance piece that sheds light on the city’s interactions with the homeless population. Produced by Sponsored By Nobody, this traveling theatrical endeavor presented the homeless interacting with ATM patrons in exchange for spare change. The performance evolved into a dialogue on gentrification and the interactions within the city between people of highly different interest groups. This project was successfully funded through Kickstarter.

Loft In The Red Zone, Fractured Atlas Foundation (ongoing)

Loft In The Red Zone proposes another call for action—though this group’s been affected by the ongoing Wall Street occupation to a bit more of a detriment. This exhibition is an artists’ tribute to New York City on the tenth anniversary of 9/11, expressing several artists’ reaction to the aftermath of the crisis. Unfortunately, barricades have gone up around the gallery in attempts to safeguard the city against the Occupy Wall Street protests, and the gallery isn’t receiving the action it needs. Donate to their Kickstarter in order to ensure that the exhibition makes enough money to stay open through October.

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Text: Fallen Empire / Bond-Fires / Fires of Desire

Fallen Empire

As the fire continues to cling on the roofs of a fallen empire, the charred black smoke lingers. Desperate bodies wander to find scraps to savour and remnants to rescue. Their aged bones are physically unable to rebuild the mythical glory they once relished 40 years ago. The Kingdom has crumbled. It has been ten years since the impending hit – 9/11- the event that created the first crack in the monumental symbol of wealth, power and security, and where we see for the first time, fear and doubt seeping into the human imagination. It was an American dream, a fallen dream, that was once everyone’s dream that we are seeing beginning to shatter. But what is left?

In the dust and ashes of the decade to follow we see sudden shifts in values and visions. We see the election of the first president of colour, a sudden awareness of global warming, a scaling back of industries, the rise of the global south, and in 2008, a major global economic meltdown. A decade following the first meteorite in the shape of an aeroplane to penetrate psyche of a masses, brings to question: what can we now fathom of the world? Can we accept that dust is dust and now we must build anew?

The fires of the forest continue to burn as nature claims its rightful power over humanity; the remaining debris of many human civilizations that came before lie buried in the Earth. Nature prevails over man once again.


Bond-fires

What we see beginning to emerge from the ashes is a new consciousness and awareness of each other in the World and in nature. We see a new generation burning with energy. A generation left to undo, remake and re-imagine a new world that was destroyed by misled visions progress of previous generations. We see an ecological turning and a movement towards traditional forms of pedagogy, craftsmanship and knowledge sharing that was lost in industrialization. But what now that continues to burn are the fires that bring us together.

Around the fire we gather, to keep warm, to provide mutual support for survival. We talk, we share stories, we dream of the past. A new system is emerging one that connects us by Ethernet that creates a model of the human mind and where we search for a collective vision. But there are forces trying to control it. A gripping past of former demons that haunts us.

We believe, we worship the spirit that brings us together, and celebrate the fires that burn within us.


Fires of Desire

Fire is heat and burning. Fires spread. It lies dormant in hotspots within the Earth, waiting to re-emerge again – connected by a network of embers. When a flame is killed, it can still grow strong again in another time and in another place. Fire moves silently – warming, cooling, sparking and burning. It is a fire of desire that lies within all our hearts. It is a desire that moves between us and that links us. There are no words for this desire that grows and burns. It is a desire that emerges and burns when fuelled and brought together collectively.

In a seeming apocalyptic time of immense change in a collapsed economy for culture as conservative governments around the world demolish the welfare state as uprisings emerge across Europe by disenchanted youth mobilized by social media resisting against high rates of unemployment and an astronomical rise in tuition fees, how do we maintain hope? How do we find space for the desire beyond economic concerns and to find new sustainable models of subsistence? Within a globalized community around the world, there is still a desire to create, and that fire will never die despite any economy or government support. How can we now begin to rebuild from the ashes a new world, a new vision of culture? How will it manifest in flames? How can we begin to spark imagination of new possibilities and utopias to question the structures that have crumbled?

Flames spread. They grow and flare up.

We are a collective of individuals from a generation lost of opportunities, lost in a time of great uncertainty, altering weather patterns, economic structural upheaval, social re-organization through digital innovations and change. Fires of desire is a sparking and ignition of an exploration of new platforms and ideas of collective working to find and create our own visions and possibilities in a world of dwindling finances and hopes for the future.

DOXA
2011

—-

Founded in 2010, DOXA is an international research collective based in London, UK. Through an on-going project called ‘Creative Space’, DOXA facilitates cross-disciplinary dialogue through open discussion events to approach new visions of culture today in light of the economic crisis, globalization and the digital turn. Through the events, DOXA brings together artists, academics, policy makers and industry professionals to explore new ways of developing and sustaining culture and creativity, while address current developments in policy, society and the economy. Doxa (δόξα) is a common belief, as opposed to knowledge; doxa is associated with community, dialogue and truth.

www.doxacollective.org

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Survey: Recession Impacts

AQ’s 4th Recession Impacts Survey: now live
11th August – 19th September 2011

Following the publication of its three reports on the impacts of the recession on the cultural sector in 2009 and 2010, Arts Quarter is repeating its online survey a year on from conducting its third such survey in order to continue to plot the ongoing affects of the current economic climate on the arts.

Some 500 organisations took part in our last such survey and we hope that many more will do so this time in order to send a clear message to key decision makers about the current state of the sector, the implications of two waves of cuts in subsidy, falls in Local Authority support and the ongoing affects of the slow progression out of the economic downturn of the last three years.

Above all, this Survey seeks to provide an opportunity for arts organisations throughout the UK to benchmark their fundraising and wider income generation performance against their peers within their artforms and regions.

This year’s survey will also seek to gather reactions to the range of initiatives announced by DCMS, ACE and HLF to boost philanthropy, following on from AQ’s Philanthropy in the Arts Consultation conducted and published in March.

The findings of this Survey will be published free of charge in October 2011.

Arts organisations may take part in this research project by clicking here

Copies of the 2010 Report may be requested by clicking here

http://www.artsquarter.co.uk/recession4.html

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Exhibition: September 11

September 11
September 11, 2011–January 9, 2012

MoMA PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue
Long Island City, NY 11101

http://www.momaps1.org

Since that fall morning in 2001, “September 11″ has come to connote a broad swath of feelings and subjects that range from the personal to the national; it has been used to justify political, security, and military decisions the world over, while continuing to weigh upon the landscape of New York and its inhabitants, particularly those directly affected by the attacks. Witnessed by an estimated two billion people, the attacks on the World Trade Center were among the most pictured disasters in history, yet they remain, a decade later, underrepresented in cultural discourse—particularly within the realm of contemporary art.

Responding to these conditions, MoMA PS1 Curator Peter Eleey brings together more than 70 works by 41 artists—many made prior to 9/11—to explore the attacks’ enduring and far-reaching resonance. Eschewing images of the event itself, as well as art made directly in response, the exhibition provides a subjective framework within which to reflect upon the attacks in New York and their aftermath, exploring the ways that they have altered how we see and experience the world in their wake. September 11 opens on the tenth anniversary of the attacks and occupies the entire second floor of the museum, with additional works located elsewhere in the building and in the surrounding neighborhood, including one of Thomas Hirschhorn’s street altars from the late 1990s, which will be installed for the first month of the exhibition on a street corner near MoMA PS1.

Artists in the Exhibition
Diane Arbus, Siah Armajani, Fiona Banner, Luis Camnitzer, Janet Cardiff, John Chamberlain, Sarah Charlesworth, Christo, Jem Cohen, Bruce Conner, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Shannon Ebner, William Eggleston, Harun Farocki, Lara Favaretto, Jane Freilicher, Maureen Gallace, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jens Haaning, Susan Hiller, Roger Hiorns, Thomas Hirschhorn, Alex Katz, Ellsworth Kelly, Barbara Kruger, Mark Lombardi, Mary Lucier, Gordon Matta-Clark, Harold Mendez, Mike Nelson, Cady Noland, Roman Ondák, Yoko Ono and John Lennon, John Pilson, Willem de Rooij, George Segal, Rosemarie Trockel, James Turrell, Stephen Vitiello, and John Williams.

Catalog
September 11 is accompanied by a fully illustrated 248-page catalog designed by Kloepfer-Ramsey and published by MoMA PS1. In addition to Peter Eleey’s curatorial essay, it includes new contributions by Robert Hullot-Kentor and Alexander Dumbadze, as well as texts by Alexander Kluge, W.J.T. Mitchell, and Retort. Distributed by D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers, Inc., available online and at the ARTBOOK shop at MoMA PS1, +1 (718) 433-1088. ISBN 978-0-9841776-3-9.

Exhibition Support
The exhibition is made possible by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation, the Teiger Foundation, and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Generous support is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.

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Project / Open Call: Twin Towers Go Global

Open Call
Where Would You Rebuild the Twin Towers?

On the eve of the 10th anniversary of 9/11, Twin Towers Go Global is issuing an international open call for responses to the question “Where would you choose to rebuild the Twin Towers? Why?” In collecting and archiving voices from across the globe, TTGG hopes to create a memorial expressive of the Towers’ significance to a wide array of individuals and cultures, as well as their continuing unifying power.

Responses can be as simple or complex as you like, and you can enter as many times as you want. They can take the form of image, essay/text, sound, video, or a mixture of these (you can even handwrite your response and take a picture of it!) Images should come in jpeg, mov, mp3, or pdf format, or type text directly into an email. Submissions will be accepted beginning July 30 and ending September 2, 2011, and all responses will be posted on an ongoing basis on our submissions gallery. Ten finalists will be selected to be highlighted on the Twin Towers Go Global website. Five will be selected by popular vote. The other five will be selected by a jury we are currently composing. On our list of possible jurors are artists, architects, scholars, celebrities, and 9/11 family members. If you would like to nominate someone for the jury, please send us their name, contact information, and why you think they would be appropriate.

The ten finalists will be posted after Tuesday, September 6, and all participants will be notified by email when finalists have been posted. Finalists will receive a special mention during the public reception of a 10th anniversary exhibition organized by TTGG resident artist Pedro Lasch at Stephan Stoyanov Gallery in New York City on September 7, 6-9pm. They will also receive a dedicated page on the TTGG website, and will be included in the 2nd Anniversary Report published by Pedro Lasch and Twin Towers Go Global on September 11, 2011 for inclusion in the international exhibition Documenta 13, through their AND AND AND platform.

If you would like to vote on your favorite idea, visit this page after September 3, and send an email with the title of your selection in the subject line of an empty email to: vote@twintowersgoglobal.org

View Gallery

Open Call Rules

Submit responses to:
Jessye McDowell
open.call@twintowersgoglobal.org

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Exhibition: Informality: Art, economics, precarity

Informality
Art, economics, precarity
14 August–2 October 2011

Stedelijk Museum Bureau
Amsterdam
Rozenstraat 59
1016 NN Amsterdam
The Netherlands
http://www.smba.nl

Open: Tuesday to Sunday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Share this announcement on: Facebook | Delicious | Twitter

The exhibition ‘Informality’ arises from the increasing attention being given to the role of banks in our economy, and the interest in alternatives to their role. It is also a first reflection on the role of art and artists in an atmosphere of crisis and cuts in cultural funding.

‘Informality’ focuses specifically on the concept of the informal economy. The informal economy is that part of commercial and the service sector that operates outside of the circuit of formal financial transactions—and thus is hidden from the sight of the Revenue Service and other governmental institutions that control business and economic affairs, and the banks themselves. In the West the informal economy makes up about 11% of the total economy. On other continents, such as Africa and Latin America, but also in former East Bloc countries, the informal economy often makes up the largest part of the total economy.

‘Informality’ examines the phenomenon from the perspective of art, involving certain informal aspects of the art world itself in doing so, including the precarious position of the artist in society.

The Domestic Workers Union (a section of the Dutch Trade Union Congress) is one of the parties responsible for the creation of the Trash Museum, which was unveiled earlier this year, to commemorate the great cleaner’s strike of 2010. The artist Matthijs de Bruijne and the designers at Detour were called in to assist in its realization. The project is an example of a campaign that was an outcome of what is called the organizer’s model: a labor union campaign built from the bottom up, rather than directed from the top down. For ‘Informality’ the cleansers were asked to supply notes about their work—analogous to the domestic memos on refrigerators and kitchen counters that are often the only form of communication between them and their bosses.

The informal economy is in a certain sense related to the concept of ‘informal art’, as is the case with sculptures made of discarded or reused objects and thus connected with the visible recycling strategies in informal economies. The contribution by Kaleb de Groot consists of recycling his own work and the contents of a small, neglected storage room at SMBA. Among the things De Groot includes are the publications which were lying there, discarded exhibition materials, and even the remains of what must once have been art objects.

The Spanish artist Marc Roig Blesa bases his Werker series on the representation of the worker, and the history of the representation of workers. With the aid of the designer Rogier Delfos this has led to a variety of publications and other graphic expressions. For ‘Informality’ Roig Blesa focuses on several artists and their kaleidoscopic blend of sidelines in fields outside the art world. Roig Blesa and Delfos appropriate this material for an idiosyncratic series of posters.

In the video It’s not you, it’s me by the British/American artist Doug Fishbone we see the artist speaking, trying to convince the viewer to make a financial contribution toward bankrolling a new project, a film. An artist will do anything to be able to realize his work.

The Mexican Jose Antonio Vega Macotela worked a total of 365 days on an exchange with the inmates of the Santa Martha Acatitla Prison in Mexico City. The prisoners could make their wishes known to the artist regarding tasks they wanted to have done outside the prison, which he then performed. In exchange Macotela asked the prisoners to perform a specific assignment for him, which resulted in a work which then became his property.

Senam Okudzeto presents a part of her installation Capitalism and Schizophrenia. The work is based on the contents of a Swiss apartment that was abandoned when its resident fled from Interpol. His lodgings proved to contain a vast archive of not only of his own notes but also of hundreds of self-help books of the ‘how I got rich’ variety, written by respected representatives of high finance. Among the things found there were documents pointing to a scam, in the form of a protracted e-mail correspondence from the criminal with a victim/collaborator in a fraud case, the owner of a Dutch lumber business.

SMBA Newsletter
SMBA Newsletter nr. 123 has appeared to accompany ‘Informality’. It contains a brief introduction to the exhibition in Dutch and English. It is available at the exhibition and can be downloaded at http://www.smba.nl

Collectivity
In addition, SMBA together with the artist Matthijs de Bruijne is organizing an evening with presentations by artists and groups for whom this quest for greater social solidarity is central.

The precise date of this presentation will be announced later.

Suggested other exhibitions and projects
-Stroom Den Haag: Time/Bank and Time/Store, http://www.stroom.nl
-Casco, Utrecht: Grand Domestic Revolution, http://www.cascoprojects.org
-De Appel, Amsterdam: Genius without Talent, http://www.deappel.nl

‘Informality’ has been organized as part of Project ‘1975’ and made possible by the Mondriaan Foundation and the Amsterdam Fund for the Arts

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